On press call, Zuckerberg says FB users "naturally engage more with sensational content" that comes close to violating its rules. Compares it to cable TV and tabloids, and says, "This seems to be true regardless of where we set our policy lines."

Zuckerberg says FB is in the process of setting up a "new independent body" that users will be able to appeal content takedowns to. Sort of like the "Facebook Supreme Court" idea he previewed earlier this year.
Zuckerberg: "One of my biggest lessons from this year is that when you connect more than 2 billion people, you’re going to see the good and bad of humanity."
This is how Facebook says it's trying to change the engagement pattern on its services. https://t.co/3p0PGc912o
[email protected] asks Zuckerberg if anyone is going to lose their job over the revelations in the NYT story. He dodges, says that personnel issues aren't a public matter, and that employee performance is evaluated all the time.
4 questions on this Q&A so far, all about yesterday's story. (This call was supposed to be about content governance.)

@JoshConstine asks about the Definers/NTK issue, Zuckerberg says "I learned about this relationship when I read the New York Times piece yesterday."
[email protected] asked if Facebook ever considered shutting off entirely in Myanmar, given all the violence there. Zuckerberg didn't answer directly, but cited earlier instances when FB took the site down/logged users out because of security concerns.
Zuckerberg gives a little more detail about the Supreme Court they're going to start testing next year. Says "it’s probably not going to handle every single case," but will adjudicate some user complaints "if you’re not happy" with the decision made by FB's internal reviewers.
Shorter version of this call: Facebook is starting a judicial branch to handle the overflow for its executive branch, which is also its legislative branch, also the whole thing is a monarchy.
Other thing: Zuckerberg's answer to @KurtWagner8's "why not shut down in Myanmar to see if it helps stop genocide" question — that FB has, in fact, shut down temporarily due to "security issues" before — was more revealing than he maybe intended!

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