"I grew up in Finland.

a) it rains all year round.

b) we have a lengthy and cold winter.

c) Finland is a sparsely populated country with just over 5mil ppl, with land size ~3/4 of CA and most of it forests and lakes.

d) no friggin body is raking the forests." @mallahadley

. . .
Trump's "assertion that California’s forest management policies are to blame for catastrophic wildfire is dangerously wrong."

https://t.co/Z9oRj77LlZ
Trump's message attacking California is "ill-informed, ill-timed and demeaning to those who are suffering as well as the men and women on the front lines."

https://t.co/Z9oRj77LlZ
"Wildfires are sparked & spread not only in forested areas but in populated areas and open fields fueled by parched vegetation, high winds, low humidity and geography. Moreover, nearly 60 percent of California forests are under federal management ... "

https://t.co/Z9oRj77LlZ
California Professional Firefighters President Brian Rice Responds to Trump's False Comments on CA Fires:
Twitter educates Trump on why we can't Make California Like Finland Again.

First, @akihheikkinen
Twitter educates Trump on why we can't Make California Like Finland Again.
Twitter educates Trump on why we can't Make California Like Finland Again.
Twitter educates Trump on why we can't Make California Like Finland Again.

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I’m torn on how to approach the idea of luck. I’m the first to admit that I am one of the luckiest people on the planet. To be born into a prosperous American family in 1960 with smart parents is to start life on third base. The odds against my very existence are astronomical.


I’ve always felt that the luckiest people I know had a talent for recognizing circumstances, not of their own making, that were conducive to a favorable outcome and their ability to quickly take advantage of them.

In other words, dumb luck was just that, it required no awareness on the person’s part, whereas “smart” luck involved awareness followed by action before the circumstances changed.

So, was I “lucky” to be born when I was—nothing I had any control over—and that I came of age just as huge databases and computers were advancing to the point where I could use those tools to write “What Works on Wall Street?” Absolutely.

Was I lucky to start my stock market investments near the peak of interest rates which allowed me to spend the majority of my adult life in a falling rate environment? Yup.