Erynn Brook
@ErynnBrook 1 year, 2 months ago 1411 views

For a while I worked in the maker space at the university library and one my favorite things to do was troll “business bro” students.

They’d come in and look around, and you can always tell it’s them cause they wear blazers all the dam time. I’d watch them look around and finally ask if they needed help.

“Oh maybe, I don’t know if you can help me. I’m looking for... *hushed voice* ... a coder.”
“Oh yeah?” I’d murmur, matching their tone and seriousness. “We do coding tutorials, no worries, everyone starts somewhere, here let me pull up the tutor schedule...”

“Heh, no, no. I’m looking for a serious coder... for a business project.” They’d answer, suddenly puffing up.
“Ahh.” I’d nod solemnly. “Well, what kind of coder? I may have one in the back.”

“A good one.” They’d day, usually pulling up a chair.

“Yes but, what coding language?”

“Oh well I don’t know, that’s up to them.” They’d wave dismissively with one hand.
I’d nod again, pretending to take notes. “A good coder. I see. Well it depends on what you need...”

“It’s an APP!” (It’s always an app)

Sometimes I’d let them launch into their pitch, sometimes I’d cut them off.

Either way I’d say: “I see, and the salary you’re offering?”
This always got blank stares.

“What? No this is like a start-up thing.”

I’d nod, still pretending to take notes. “I see, so you’re offering 50% of the company.”

They’d shake their heads and go “What? No. I mean we’ll see if it makes money, but this is a great idea!”
Me: “So you are providing the idea and you want a coder to build it all, trouble shoot, test, maintain, and you’re doing... what exactly?”

Business Bro: “I’ll be handling the business side of things.”

Me: “That’s great. So, what salary are you offering again?”
Business Bro: “look this is a really exciting idea and I need a great coder to work on it and help bring it to life.”

Me: *scratching stuff out on my fake notes* “Hold on, you said you needed a good coder when you came in. Now you need a great coder?”
Business Bro: “I’ve got an idea for an app and I need someone to build it. It’s gonna be great.”

Me: “That’s awesome, starting salary for a senior app developer is 80k plus benefits.”

BB: “What?”

Me: “I mean, it’s a very in-demand skill set.”
Business Bro: “I don’t have that kind of money, but this idea is a million dollar idea if I can get someone to build it. I just need to put my ideas together with a coding genius to make it happen.”

Me: *putting down fake notes* “coding genius...?”
Me: *staring hard at business bro* So let me get this straight. You have an idea for an app that you’re convinced will be successful but you need someone else to build it. So you’re bringing the idea.

BB: exactly!

Me: what makes you think coders don’t have their own ideas?
Business Bro: *silence*

Me: so I’ve got an opening on Wednesday at 2pm with our JavaScript tutor, I recommend starting there. Unless you’ve never played around with HTML/CSS?

BB:

More from Erynn Brook

I run into this mindset a lot and it bugs me on so many levels, as an educator, as an internet person, as a communicator and as an introvert.


In fact most of my university time has been filled with this kind of rhetoric, mostly from professors, from laptop bans to full-on tirades about “back in my day”.

Which is especially fascinating given that almost all of my profs are boomers and according to the stats...

“Baby boomers spend 27 hours per week online, which is two hours more per week than those who are between 16 and

I like digital spaces. In some ways they feel more real, we don’t talk about how’s the weather and how’s your sister and all those annoying scripted conversation topics.

If I want to sit here and type a feminist rant I can; and I’m not going to get hauled off by the cops for disturbing the peace.

I can have deep, meaningful conversations and connections with people without navigating the sensory overload of public spaces.
I don’t have a son, but if I did, and he was accused of sexually assaulting someone, I would look him in the eye and ask him what he had done. And he would know from my face that lying would be the worst choice he could make.


I don’t have a brother, but if I did and he was accused of sexually assaulting someone, I would call him up and say “is it true?” And he would know from my voice that lying would mean the end of our relationship.

I do have a husband, and if anyone accused him of sexually assaulting someone I’d look at him and say “tell me what happened.” And I would know if he was lying in that moment.

And if they lied I would come out and say “they’re lying.” And if they told the truth and they had done horrible things I would come out in support of their accuser. And if they told me a story about how nothing happened, I’d say I need to hear it from her.

There are plenty of wonderful husbands, brothers and sons who were shitty boyfriends, shitty dates, shitty friends, shitty acquaintances, somewhere at some point in their lives.

More from Makers

And here they are...

THE WINNERS OF THE 24 HOUR STARTUP CHALLENGE

Remember, this money is just fun. If you launched a product (or even attempted a launch) - you did something worth MUCH more than $1,000.

#24hrstartup

The winners 👇

#10

Lattes For Change - Skip a latte and save a life.

https://t.co/M75RAirZzs

@frantzfries built a platform where you can see how skipping your morning latte could do for the world.

A great product for a great cause.

Congrats Chris on winning $250!


#9

Instaland - Create amazing landing pages for your followers.

https://t.co/5KkveJTAsy

A team project! @bpmct and @BaileyPumfleet built a tool for social media influencers to create simple "swipe up" landing pages for followers.

Really impressive for 24 hours. Congrats!


#8

SayHenlo - Chat without distractions

https://t.co/og0B7gmkW6

Built by @DaltonEdwards, it's a platform for combatting conversation overload. This product was also coded exclusively from an iPad 😲

Dalton is a beast. I'm so excited he placed in the top 10.


#7

CoderStory - Learn to code from developers across the globe!

https://t.co/86Ay6nF4AY

Built by @jesswallaceuk, the project is focused on highlighting the experience of developers and people learning to code.

I wish this existed when I learned to code! Congrats on $250!!

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The YouTube algorithm that I helped build in 2011 still recommends the flat earth theory by the *hundreds of millions*. This investigation by @RawStory shows some of the real-life consequences of this badly designed AI.


This spring at SxSW, @SusanWojcicki promised "Wikipedia snippets" on debated videos. But they didn't put them on flat earth videos, and instead @YouTube is promoting merchandising such as "NASA lies - Never Trust a Snake". 2/


A few example of flat earth videos that were promoted by YouTube #today:
https://t.co/TumQiX2tlj 3/

https://t.co/uAORIJ5BYX 4/

https://t.co/yOGZ0pLfHG 5/
“We don’t negotiate salaries” is a negotiation tactic.

Always. No, your company is not an exception.

A tactic I don’t appreciate at all because of how unfairly it penalizes low-leverage, junior employees, and those loyal enough not to question it, but that’s negotiation for you after all. Weaponized information asymmetry.

Listen to Aditya


And by the way, you should never be worried that an offer would be withdrawn if you politely negotiate.

I have seen this happen *extremely* rarely, mostly to women, and anyway is a giant red flag. It suggests you probably didn’t want to work there.

You wish there was no negotiating so it would all be more fair? I feel you, but it’s not happening.

Instead, negotiate hard, use your privilege, and then go and share numbers with your underrepresented and underpaid colleagues. […]
Recently, the @CNIL issued a decision regarding the GDPR compliance of an unknown French adtech company named "Vectaury". It may seem like small fry, but the decision has potential wide-ranging impacts for Google, the IAB framework, and today's adtech. It's thread time! 👇

It's all in French, but if you're up for it you can read:
• Their blog post (lacks the most interesting details):
https://t.co/PHkDcOT1hy
• Their high-level legal decision: https://t.co/hwpiEvjodt
• The full notification: https://t.co/QQB7rfynha

I've read it so you needn't!

Vectaury was collecting geolocation data in order to create profiles (eg. people who often go to this or that type of shop) so as to power ad targeting. They operate through embedded SDKs and ad bidding, making them invisible to users.

The @CNIL notes that profiling based off of geolocation presents particular risks since it reveals people's movements and habits. As risky, the processing requires consent — this will be the heart of their assessment.

Interesting point: they justify the decision in part because of how many people COULD be targeted in this way (rather than how many have — though they note that too). Because it's on a phone, and many have phones, it is considered large-scale processing no matter what.